Recruiting Franchise Opportunity Blog

Your Job Search is a Bare Knuckle Fight! Part 2. Hard-hitting Interview Tips.

Posted by Jeff Herzog on Tue, Feb 11, 2014 @ 14:02 PM

Last month we launched part one of our new eBook, “Your Job Search is a Bare Knuckle Fight. The FPC Recruiters’ Guide to Winning!” In it we shared tough advice about what it takes to get a job in this continuing difficult business climate. your job search is a bae knuckle fight part 2

The information in part one was intended to help you organize and implement an effective job search, the way we recruiters do it. And that’s much different than how outplacement services and job coaches tell you to go about it.

If you’ve read part one and taken it to heart, you’re well on your way to lining up some juicy interviews. That’s where part two of the Bare Knuckle Guide comes in. We believe that the interview advice most people get is way too soft and way too generalized.

As recruiters, we’re preparing candidates for interviews every day – and seeing the results of how those people actually handle themselves in the interview situation – for better or worse. We know what lands the job – and what lands you on the mat.

We’ve dug into our experience to share with you real world anecdotes about both successful and unsuccessful interview moves. Some come from interviewees. Some come from hiring managers. Some come from job search industry leaders.

Among many other important lessons, you’ll learn why:

  • You must be respectful to every person you meet in the interview process regardless of their position
  • The couch in the waiting area is off limits
  • Showing off your knowledge of the company can work against you
  • Your language must be very, very specific

Part two of the Bare Knuckle Guide also explains why you may need to act as your own recruiter and how to do for free what we do for a fee.

It’s hard enough to line up interviews for promising positions. Especially if you’re listening to and trying to follow the ‘rules’ we tell you about in part one – the ones that don’t work if you want to be employed.

When you finally do get a chance to sit down with a hiring manager at a company you really want to work for, you have to know how to assess whether the opportunity is as good as you think it is – and, if so, how to close the deal. This is particularly important for senior executives who have been out of work for six months or more and are stressing out about how to pay the bills and the kids’ college tuitions.

In writing this eBook, I put my heart into sharing some of the professional techniques that I and my fellow FPC recruiters use to help our job candidates build solid careers. It really kills me to see talented, experienced men and women going through long, painful periods of unemployment – especially when it’s unnecessary.

When we launched part one of the eBook last month, I said that the advice is blunt and that some of the activities won’t feel comfortable at first. But you owe it to yourself to push the limits a bit if it means getting back to work.

If you haven’t read part one yet, there will be opportunities when you download part two to get it. Look for links on the download page and also right within the part two pdf. We tried to have some fun in putting this eBook together with lots of boxing references and vintage images. It helps to smile when things are rough.

Enjoy both parts of the Bare Knuckle guide. Feel free to get in touch to let us know how it’s working for you. And if you start to think that this recruiter stuff might be fun as your next career, you’ll be right. It can also make you a darn good living – especially if you do it as the owner of an FPC Executive Recruiting franchise. It’s an incredible way to leverage your past experience and industry contacts, while taking control of your career at a time when corporate careers are increasingly risky.

Click the button below to get The Bare Knuckle Guide, Part Two.

eBook Your Job Search is a Bare Knuckle Fight

Topics: Changing Careers, Career Advice, Interview Tips, Job Search Advice